Mercedes-Benz Vans


  • 79F28
    Mercedes-Benz 307 E prototype vehicle with an electric drive system on the basis of the TN van model series, also known as the T 1 (centre). Photo taken on the test track of the Mercedes-Benz plant in Untertürkheim in 1979 with other vehicles while testing alternative drive systems. On the left, a Mercedes-Benz urban bus with a hydrogen drive; on the right, a saloon of model series 123 with a methanol drive.
  • 80F172
    Mercedes-Benz 307 E prototype vehicle with an electric drive system on the basis of the TN van model series, also known as the T 1. Photo taken in 1980 on the test track in Stuttgart-Untertürkheim.
  • 80F173
    Mercedes-Benz 307 E prototype vehicle with an electric drive system on the basis of the TN van model series, also known as the T 1. Photo taken in 1980 on the test track in Stuttgart-Untertürkheim.
  • 80F180
    Mercedes-Benz passenger cars and commercial vehicles, test vehicles for alternative drive systems. Group photocall on the test track in Untertürkheim, 1980.
  • 00086272
    Mercedes-Benz 307 E prototype vehicle with an electric drive system on the basis of the TN van model series, also known as the T 1. Not only electric drive concepts were tested, but also the “route planner”, a forerunner of the navigation system. That system provided information to allow a possible route change. The picture shows the situation in the case of a congestion warning. The Hannover-Nord motorway junction is jammed, so the journey time is extended by 24 minutes compared to the usual duration.
  • 2000M405
    Mercedes-Benz L 319 on the Canary Islands, 1960.
  • 68916
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 bus, 1955.
  • 20C0405_001
     Mercedes-Benz body drawing dated 27 February 1951 for a vehicle with a payload of 1.3 metric tonnes leading up to the L 319/O 319 presented in 1955. This design still featured a conventional frame with rigid axles as well as coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers at the front and rear. The standard vehicle featured a more complex design. It featured a chassis subframe and a body with a welded ladder-type frame as a self-supporting body. Engine, transmission, steering, the rigid front axle with multi-leaf longitudinal springs, torsion-bar stabiliser and telescopic shock absorbers (angled towards the rear) were linked to the chassis subframe, which had been elastically screwed to the floor assembly at four points. A rigid banjo axle featuring leaf springs and – once again – angled telescopic shock absorbers were installed at the rear. Coil springs supported the leaf springs in the event of increasing loads.
  • 20C0405_002
    Mercedes-Benz test body as a panel van leading up to the L 319 presented in 1955. The front end still differed from what would later be the series-production vehicle.
  • 20C0405_003
    Mercedes-Benz test body as a minibus leading up to the O 319 presented in 1955. The front end still differed from what would later be the series-production vehicle.
  • 20C0405_004
    Mercedes-Benz test body as a minibus with glazing around the edge of the roof leading up to the O 319 presented in 1955. The front end still differed from what would later be the series-production vehicle.
  • 1988M1298
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 and O 319 D. “The large minibus” advert dated 1956.
  • 00006100
    Mercedes-Benz L 319, platform truck. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • 00010345
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 with glazing around the edge of the roof and camp er van equipment. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • 00012345
    Mercedes-Benz L 405, platform truck with a crew cab. Contemporary photograph dated early  1960s.
  • 00015032
    Mercedes-Benz L 405 (successor to the L 319 D), low loader. Contemporary photograph dated early 1960s.
  • 00015047
    Mercedes-Benz L 406 (successor to the L 319 D), low loader with frame and tarpaulin. Contemporary photograph dated early 1960s.
  • 54219-1
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 with glazing around the edge of the roof. Last test car version prior to series-production launch, testing at Stelvio Pass, circa 1955 or 1956. The front end still differed from what would later be the series-production vehicle. The L 319 and O 319 were introduced in September 1955.
  • 68864
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 luxury coach variant with glazing around the edge of the roof and seating for ten passengers plus driver. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • 68923
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 with glazing around the edge of the roof and seating for seventeen passengers plus driver. Contemporary photograph dated either 1955 or 1956.
  • 77686
    Mercedes-Benz L 319 and O 319. Cross-section drawing dated 1957 with body structure, drivetrain and axles.
  • 77687
    Mercedes-Benz L 319 and O 319. Cross-section drawing dated 1957 with main focus on chassis and drivetrain. Secondary aspect: body of an O 319 with glazing around the edge of the roof and folding sunroof.
  • 87504
    Mercedes-Benz L 319, sales van. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s, taken in Durban, South Africa.
  • 00094365
    Mercedes-Benz L 319, title page of the first sales brochure, circa 1956. The van was shown loaded with a host of parcels to underline its ample transport volume.
  • 00094366
    Mercedes-Benz L 319, title page of a sales brochure, circa 1956. Van with sliding door next to a Mercedes-Benz 190 SL underlines the kinship of the Mercedes-Benz face in both vehicles.
  • 97187
    Mercedes-Benz L 319/L 319 D, panel van equipped as a workshop van of the Berlin-Marienfelde plant. “Mercedes-Benz. Ihre beste Kraft.” (“Mercedes-Benz. Your greatest strength.”) slogan on the body. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • Si51966
    Mercedes-Benz prototype with a payload of 1.5 metric tonnes leading up to the L 319/O 319 presented in 1955. Photograph dated 24 August 1951. This prototype still featured a conventional frame with rigid axles as well as coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers at the front and rear. The standard vehicle featured a more complex design. It featured a chassis subframe and a body with a welded ladder-type frame as a self-supporting body. Engine, transmission, steering, the rigid front axle with multi-leaf longitudinal springs, torsion-bar stabiliser and telescopic shock absorbers (angled towards the rear) were linked to the chassis subframe, which had been elastically screwed to the floor assembly at four points. A rigid banjo axle featuring leaf springs and – once again – angled telescopic shock absorbers were installed at the rear. Coil springs supported the leaf springs in the event of increasing loads.
  • Si51969
    Mercedes-Benz prototype with a payload of 1.5 metric tonnes leading up to the L 319/O 319 presented in 1955. Photograph dated 24 August 1951. This prototype still featured a conventional frame with rigid axles as well as coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers at the front and rear. The standard vehicle featured a more complex design. It featured a chassis subframe and a body with a welded ladder-type frame as a self-supporting body. Engine, transmission, steering, the rigid front axle with multi-leaf longitudinal springs, torsion-bar stabiliser and telescopic shock absorbers (angled towards the rear) were linked to the chassis subframe, which had been elastically screwed to the floor assembly at four points. A rigid banjo axle featuring leaf springs and – once again – angled telescopic shock absorbers were installed at the rear. Coil springs supported the leaf springs in the event of increasing loads.
  • U1050
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 with glazing around the edge of the roof used in Switzerland between Gstaad and the Turbach health resort. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • U1114
    Mercedes-Benz L 319 B, LF 8 fire service vehicle. Contemporary photograph dated 1956.
  • U1324
    Mercedes-Benz L 319, “Braunschweiger Zeitung” panel van. Contemporary photograph dated 1956.
  • U36928
    Mercedes-Benz L 408 (successor to the L 319), ambulance van with Binz body. Contemporary photograph dated 1966.
  • U37010
    Mercedes-Benz O 319 D luxury coach variant with glazing around the edge of the roof and seating for ten passengers plus driver. Contemporary photograph dated 1950s/1960s.
  • 08C376_040
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter of the first generation (901 model series, from 1995).
  • 08C376_045
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter of the first generation (901 model series, from 1995).
  • 08C376_051
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, first generation after the 2000 facelift (model series 902 to 905).
  • 08C376_057
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, first generation after the 2000 facelift (model series 902 to 905).
  • A95F1638
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter of the first generation (901 model series, from 1995).
  • A2001F3976
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter with fuel cell drive. Photo from practical testing while operated by a delivery service in 2001.
  • D24366
    Mercedes-Benz Sprinter of the second generation (206 model series, 2006 to 2013 version). Photo from 2015.
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